This summer, shadowers can continue their reading journey..

Alison Brumwell is a librarian for Booksplus, Leeds and Director of the Morley Literature Festival. She blogs here about her role as a judge for the 2014 Carnegie & Kate Greenaway Children’s Book Awards.

There are only seven weeks until the end of another school year, which has made me reflect not only on my time as a Carnegie and Greenaway medal judge but also upon the huge positive impact reading can have on a child’s life. Learning isn’t just about what happens in a classroom; there are so many other ways for librarians, teachers and parents to inspire a love of language and story.

Public libraries across the country are geared up to support reading through a variety of initiatives, including Chatterbooks reading groups and this year’s Summer Reading Challenge. Mythical Maze launches in July, with fantastic illustrations by Sarah MacIntyre, and offers plenty of opportunities for children to read for pleasure during the summer holidays.

We are extremely fortunate in West Yorkshire to have year-round access to Cliffe House outdoor learning centre, a lovely venue in which to share reading and deliver outreach sessions. This week, we are celebrating the 25th anniversary of the picture book classic ‘We’re Going on a Bear Hunt’, with storytelling and an outdoor bear trail through the extensive gounds. Sessions themed upon the 2014 Greenaway short-listed book ‘Where My Wellies Take Me‘ will be delivered later on this summer, bringing the words of Michael and Clare Morpurgo and the illustrations of Olivia Lomenech Gill to life.

We're Going on a Bear Hunt

We’re Going on a Bear Hunt

 

 

Find out more about:

the other judges
the 2014 Carnegie & Kate Greenaway Children’s Book Awards
the shadowing scheme
our latest news on Twitter

My Year 11’s book club: reading, chocolate and revision!

Hannah Thomson is a Learning Resource Centre Manager at Foxford School and Community Arts College. She blogs here about her role as a judge for the 2014 Carnegie & Kate Greenaway Children’s Book Awards.

This month I have been in overdrive and although my reading for this year’s Carnegie and Kate Greenaway awards is coming to an end, I am now catching up with all of the other delicious books that I have missed out on whilst Hannah Thomsondistracted by this year’s shortlist!

I have really enjoyed meeting with secondary school students. The Yr. 11 girls within my own reading group have been moving into exam season and our book clubs have been full of reading but also chocolate fuelled and revision led!

I was also invited to speak with two reading groups from Staffordshire University Academy earlier this month, to talk to them about the judging process and the shortlisted CKG titles. We had a great time (and I LOVED it!) it is always a huge treat for me to speak to young people and I love hearing their own views and opinions about books.

They were incredibly enthusiastic and it really was quite refreshing to hear their viewpoints after all of the discussions and tweets that I had been reading. They had very definite perspectives on some of the titles, and views that were always fresh and thoughtful. I hope that I inspired them as much as they inspired me!

Meeting and listening to students helps me to believe that whatever the subject matter, a book is always a safe place. I believe that this year’s shortlist has very much allowed them the opportunity to ask questions and form opinions and viewpoints about experiences outside of their own. Isn’t that why we all, as readers, keep going back for more?

 

Find out more about:

the other judges
the 2014 Carnegie & Kate Greenaway Children’s Book Awards
the shadowing scheme
our latest news on Twitter

 

My skype session with the British School of Brussels

Alison Brumwell is a librarian for Booksplus, Leeds and Director of the Morley Literature Festival. She blogs here about her role as a judge for the 2014 Carnegie & Kate Greenaway Children’s Book Awards.

European shadowers, the British School of Brussels

European shadowers, the British School of Brussels

Earlier this month I had the pleasure of skyping the Carnegie Medal shadowing group at The British School of Brussels. The group is quite large and includes Y7 – Y9 pupils, with sessions led by Barry Sayer and Carolyn Baker.

As I rarely Skype, our discussion required some practice beforehand on my part, supported by my daughter. Thankfully there were no technical glitches on the day and we had a very lively group conversation for about 40 minutes. The group sent me some questions in advance, which were extremely well thought out. Questions ranged from the issue of confidentiality for the judges to the criteria we apply during the judging process. I felt it was important to point out that the criteria are really what unify and inform judges’ debate about books we’ve read when we meet as a group. We all have our own individual ways of reading a text; some of us take more notes than others; some of us read reviews throughout the process, including those on the shadowing website and some (like me) avoid them until after our final meeting. And we all have our own favourite authors, which can make judging such a challenging enterprise; “loving” a particular author or a particular book has no place when we decide on our shortlists and, ultimately, our Carnegie and Kate Greenaway Medal winners. As I explained to the group, it’s all about which shortlisted book best meets the criteria and is deemed theAlison Brumwell outstanding book of that particular year.

It was a treat for me to hear group members speak about their favourite authors and novels, which ranged from ‘Ketchup Clouds’ by Annabel Pitcher to ‘Private Peaceful’ by Michael Morpurgo. And they are all big Katherine Rundell fans, as she is an alumnus of the school! Perhaps the most interesting question was whether there should be two Carnegie Medal categories to accommodate the increasingly wide range of novels that are nominated each year, something I feel would dilute the impact of the award.

I am really looking forward to finding out what The British School of Brussels Carnegie Medal shadowing group choice is for 2014. They will be casting their own votes this Friday and will find out on 23 June who the winner(s) are. I was disappointed not to be able to speak to all members of the group, but many thanks to Barry and Carolyn for organising the session and special thanks to the very articulate Matthieu, Margot, Ewan, Tara, Konrad, Izzy, Jack, Aditya, Michael and Lafika.

 

Find out more about:

the other judges
the 2014 Carnegie & Kate Greenaway Children’s Book Awards
the shadowing scheme
our latest news on Twitter.

CKG Secrets

Kara Orford is Community Librarian for Denbighshire Libraries and recently achieved Chartered status. She blogs about her experience as a 2014 Carnegie Greenaway judge.

When I embarked upon this quite marvellous judging journey, the thing that I was most Kara Orfordworried about was the sheer amount of reading that I knew came with the territory.  Everyone tells you about it, previous judges prepare you for the fact that you are quite possibly going to have to put your life on hold for a good few months and bunker down (I know that ‘hunker down’ is what I really mean, but I couldn’t resist a cheeky Kevin Brooks reference!)

Anyway, panicking about reading ALL of the nominations is par for the course so that didn’t come as a surprise at all –I just stocked up on chocolate, used up an awful lot of annual leave from work and spent a lot of time in my pyjamas! What I was quite unprepared for though, was the responsibility as a judge to quite simply keep schtum! To keep it ‘zipped’ and to keep hush when it came to lots of elements of judging – That, I wasn’t quite so prepared for!

Working with Sarah, the fabulous School Librarian, I run a CKG shadowing group in a nearby high school and once the longlist was announced, our little group began diligently making our way through the 20 titles.  Now, the time came when myself and the rest of the judging panel had whittled this longlist down into a rather stonking shortlist that had yet to be announced.  There was something of a gap before the list was released and all the time I had to listen to my lovely group saying things like “Well I think that one will DEFINITELY make the shortlist” or “There’s no way that will be on the shortlist, it’s absolutely rubbish!” all the time I was thinking  ‘BUT I KNOW IT IS!!!!!!  AGHGGHGH I KNOW, I KNOW, I KNOW!!!’ I was bursting at the seams but couldn’t tell a soul. For a chatter box like me, this was difficult!

I enjoyed following the debate on Twitter as librarians, publishers & all round eager beavers predicted what the shortlist might look like, all the while staring at my screen thinking ‘You’re WRONG!  You’ve missed off Julie Berry!’ or some such.  I wanted to talk about it, I wanted to natter about my first years’ experience of judging  to anyone who would listen.  I wanted to explain how vigorously we had debated the nominations and longlist, I wanted to tell people about the books that proved most controversial in our discussion, I wanted to spill the beans on just how close some books had come to making the shortlist and how hard some judges had battled to earn them a place there.  But I couldn’t.  Not yet.  I couldn’t say a thing.

You see the thing is, keeping secrets is part and parcel of being a judge, it says so on our job description!  (Bet you didn’t know we had a job description, but we do!)  Right there on the list of our responsibilities as judges it says in black and white “To maintain confidentiality.”  Well I’ll let you in on a secret of my own…

When I feel like I’m about to POP with excitement from judging and all of the Carnegie Greenaway that I have fizzing through my brain, I hotfoot it over to tell my friend Fin ALL about it.  I go on and on and on and on, giving him the juiciest gossip and the most controversial of insights and the best thing of all is, I know he won’t tell a soul!

Cara Orford and Fin

Kara and Fin!

You see Fin is only 5 months old, and whilst he seems to be more of a Greenaway fan than a Carnegie enthusiast at the moment, he listens to every word I say.  I get to share my secrets with someone and know 110% that he won’t let the cat out of the bag! Phewee, what a relief!

To be honest, I think Fin will be relieved when the winner is announced – Keeping these secrets is a lot of pressure for the both of us!  ; )

 

Find out more about:

the other judges
the 2014 Carnegie & Kate Greenaway Children’s Book Awards
the shadowing scheme
our latest news on Twitter.